2018 AT Summit Program (Day 1)


 

 

 

Breakout Sessions begin at 9:45am following the Keynote. Sessions noted with * are eligible for AICP credit hours, fill out the sign in sheet when you arrive.

Breakout 1

Sessions begin at 9:45am

 

ETC + CCIM = BFF: Re-making Portland’s Streets to Serve a Growing City

Panel: Gabe Graff, Portland Bureau of Transportation; April Bertelsen, Portland Bureau of Transportation; Kelly Betteridge, TriMet; Catherine Ciarlo, Portland Bureau of Transportation
Room: Conservation Hall A
Time: 9:45am – 11:15am

Over the past year, the Portland Bureau of Transportation and TriMet have collaborated to create a toolkit for Enhanced Transit Corridors (ETC) — a set of moderate capital and operational treatments to help buses move more quickly and reliably through increasingly congested corridors. These flexible, context-sensitive fixes can be deployed relatively quickly to address “hot spot” bottlenecks or improve an entire corridor. In the meantime, PBOT has launched the Central City in Motion (CCIM) project to create a network of pedestrian safety improvements, protected bikeways, and transit priority investments in the Portland central city.

Now ETC and CCIM are joining forces to make downtown and Central Eastside streets function more efficiently in the face of rapid growth and in line with City policy and goals. Come participate in a roundtable discussion about the tools, challenges, and opportunities emerging from this cutting-edge work to reshape Portland’s hard-working central city streets. Project staff will briefly share information and spend the remaining time fielding questions on how the CCIM/ETC partnership aims to re-imagine and reinvigorate the economic heart of our region, and strengthen its connection to outlying neighborhoods.

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HB 2017: Transit, Walking, and Biking, Safe Routes to School, and Low Income Fare

Panel: Aaron Deas, TriMet; Gerik Kransky, The Street Trust; John Gardner, TriMet; Susan Peithman, Oregon Department of Transportation
Room: Conservation Hall B
Time: 9:45am – 11:15am

House Bill 2017 is a $5.3 billion package for improvements in Oregon’s transportation systems. Oregon legislators passed a historic transportation funding package which includes a landmark investment in Safe Routes to School at $125 million over the next ten years, and dedicates a record $1.3 billion to transit service and infrastructure projects that make it safer and easier to get around by walking, rolling, and riding transit. Included in this session will be an overview of the history and context of the bill, TriMet’s low-income fare program, more equitable service across the region, safe routes to school, and what’s ahead for walking and biking and access to transit. Come to learn, share, and add your voice to the conversation.

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How does Social Justice for People of Color inform transportation planning, programming, and design?

Panel: Alexis Gabriel, City of Portland (Sunday Parkways); Ira Dixon, Programs Manager, Community Cycling Center; Sharon White, Pedestrian Safety Outreach and Education, City of Portland; Marisa DeMull, Alta Planning + Design; Joy Alise Davis, PAALF People’s Action Plan and Design + Culture Lab; Sumi Malik, HDR; Liz Hormann, Adaptive BIKETOWN; Sergent John Holbrook, Immigrant and Refugee Driver Series; Brianna Orr, City of Portland
Room: Skyline
Time: 9:45am – 11:15am

Hear from Public, Non-profit and Private Transportation specialists discuss strategies for expanding programming to encourage active transportation usage among People of Color, Immigrants and Refugees, People with Disabilities and People with Low-incomes. We break away from the myth – if we build they will come – and look for opportunities to expand the circle in ways that support these communities. While there is no exact recipe for equity, we would like to share our stories and encourage our fellow transportation colleagues to look for ways to do expand equity in their work. The opening segment will provide a 40-minute presentation on programs already in existence that support inclusion and active transportation.

The following 50-min round-table discussion segment will generate conversation around the intersection of active transportation, equity, and social justice, focused on race. The moderator and panelists will set the stage, but the aim is to have a discussion among all attendees. Example topics will be: Who is in the community (what are the demographics), and how do they get around? What does it feel like to be a POC in Portland and public spaces? Why is active transportation important to POC, a combination of our most vulnerable populations and transportation users? How does social justice inform transportation engineering and design, knowing that driver behavior is different around POC? What are the implications for engagement? Enforcement? Access? This session will start what organizers hope will be an ongoing conversation among professionals, advocates, allies, and POC.

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Breakout 2

Sessions begin at 1:00pm

From Strategies to Sidewalks and Safety Education: Funding, Planning, and Implementing SRTS Programs Across Oregon*

Panel: Hannah Day-Kapell, Alta Planning + Design; LeeAnne Fergason, Oregon Department of Transportation; Dan Kaempff, Metro; Carolyn Chase, Lane Transit District
Room: Conservation Hall A
Time: 1:00pm – 1:45pm

The 2017 transportation funding package changed the game for Safe Routes to School (SRTS) in Oregon by dedicating funding to infrastructure projects that will improve access to schools. At the same time, communities throughout Oregon are investing in non-infrastructure education, outreach, and planning efforts to enable families to get to school safely and easily.

This session will provide an overview of the ODOT SRTS Infrastructure funding and how to get prepared with competitive projects. It will highlight two case studies: Metro will present the recently-completed Regional Travel Options (RTO) Strategy Update, which identifies a structure and next steps for implementing a region-wide SRTS program. Lane Transit District will highlight the recent SRTS Strategy, including project identification and prioritization. We will invite audience members to bring their questions about getting prepared for upcoming funding opportunities and for implementing local SRTS programs in their communities.

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Portland’s Placemaking Renaissance*

Panel: Ryan Hashagen, Better Block PDX; Sarah Figliozzi, PBOT; Greg Raisman, PBOT; Gwen Shaw, Toole Design Group; Nick Falbo, City of Portland
Room: Skyline
Time: 1:00pm – 1:45pm

Tactical urbanism and pop-up placemaking approaches are showing up everywhere: transportation, community events, and academia. The City of Portland’s new Livable Streets Strategy opens the door for community members to create their own place, recognizing streets as public spaces. Portland’s Sunday Parkways events now feature temporary placemaking elements, and new efforts at Last Thursday on Alberta to increase cultural understanding and encourage sustainable placemaking practices. BetterBlock PDX has partnered with PSU to channel the energy and talent of students to support community-led transformations in the public sphere. Learn how these different approaches to flexible placemaking can be empowering to the community.

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Transit Ridership Trends and Economic Dynamics*

Panel: Jeff Owen, TriMet; Tom Mills, TriMet; Michelle Poyourow, Jarrett Walker and Associates
Room: Conservation Hall B
Time: 1:00pm – 1:45pm

This session will explore how the movement of potential transit riders towards the edge of a city challenges transit networks and transit budgets, using examples from Oregon cities and elsewhere in the US. Included will be an overview of radial and grid transit networks, where they work well (or don’t), and why. Learn about some of the ways that low-wage job centers (such as industrial or retail) can be designed for access to useful transit. Also hear about TriMet’s recent ridership analysis that surfaced the economic displacement of low-income earners from inner city neighborhoods to first ring suburbs, and hear how the agency plans to address the issues, including expanded service in the suburbs, making roadway and signal improvements that help buses move through traffic congestion, and TriMet’s plan to develop a low-income fare program. These combined efforts are meant to improve the reach and quality of transit, making it more appealing to more people to grow bus ridership.

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Vision Zero: Making it work from Urban Arterials to Medium Size Cities*

Panel: Sharon Daleo, Jacobs; Elizabeth Mahon, Portland Bureau of Transportation; Larisa Varela, City of Eugene Public Works
Room: Conservation Hall C
Time: 1:00pm – 1:45pm

The challenges with making Vision Zero a reality differ depending upon the community. The City of Portland is making strides to substantially improve safety along the multimodal five-lane arterial of Outer Division, but the proposed improvements have not come without significant challenges like property access, freight, parking and loading zones while incorporating access management with enhanced pedestrian crossings and protected bike lanes. On a different end of the spectrum, The City of Eugene is the smallest city in the United States to adopt a Vision Zero Resolution and develop an Action Plan. As such, the City has a unique perspective on how to start toward the ambitious and serious goal of eliminating deaths and life-changing injuries on streets. This session will provide an overview of the issues faced with designing to Vision Zero on an urban arterial as well as the strengths and challenges of developing a Vision Zero Action Plan within a small city. These successes and lessons will help other agencies in Oregon marshal their resources toward improving the safety of their streets.

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Breakout 3

Sessions begin at 2:00pm
Q+A ODOT’s Safe Routes to School Infrastructure Program

Panel: LeeAnne Fergason and Susan Peithman, ODOT
Room: Conservation Hall A
Time: 2:00pm – 2:45pm

In 2017, the Oregon Legislature passed HB2017 which dedicates infrastructure funding to walking and biking projects near schools. Starting in January of 2018, $10 million (increasing to $15 million in 2023) annually of state funding will flow into the Safe Routes to School Fund for these infrastructure projects. The Oregon Department of Transportation is working with an advisory committee to develop recommendations on program design, guidance and administrative rules for the Oregon Transportation Commission. This session will be an overview of these recommendations, an opportunity to learn about the process, provide feedback on the program recommendations, learn about the draft timeline including the call for proposals and ask questions to ODOT staff.

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Happy Trails: the status of off-street biking and walking projects in the metro region and statewide

Panel: Robert Spurlock, Metro; Robin Wilcox, State of Oregon; David Amiton, State of Oregon
Room: Conservation Hall B
Time: 2:00pm – 2:45pm

Metro, Oregon Parks & Recreation Department (OPRD), and Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) are working around the region and across the state on trails projects. Metro is working with partners region-wide to creation a 1,000-mile network of off-street paths and trails. OPRD is responsible for funding, designing, and managing recreation trails for hikers, cyclists, and OHVs. OPRD is developing an action plan to complete the remaining 50 miles of “gaps” in the Oregon Coast Trail, a 382-mile long trail from the Columbia River to the California border. ODOT is working with local jurisdiction and agency partners to plan, fund, design, and construct off-street paths along and across the state highway system. This presentation highlights new trail projects, and discusses opportunities and challenges with trail funding, design, and management.

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Finding Equitable Harmony Between Technology and Active Transportation*

Panel: Karla Kingsley, Kittelson & Associates; Sergio Lopez, Forth Mobility; Keith Szot, BlueMAC Analytics; Camilla Dartnell, Kittelson & Associates; Ira Dixon, Community Cycling Center
Room: Skyline
Time: 2:00pm – 2:45pm

Emerging new transportation technologies are already impacting our lives and are expected to continue changing our transportation systems. The compounding effects of connected and automated vehicles (CAVs), electric vehicles and bicycles, ride-hailing apps, and other technology-based innovations will have major impacts, and the anticipated effects of these technologies on our system vary widely. This panel will explore the following questions through brief presentations of examples followed by a participatory discussion. What are the expected benefits or impacts for walking and bicycling? How can we ensure that these technologies improve our safety and livability instead of the opposite? How can we work to ensure equitable benefits from investments in new technologies and avoid disproportionate impacts? What are the best ways to introduce new transportation technology into diverse communities?

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Slow Down! Why speed is important in realizing your Vision Zero goals and how to achieve the speeds you need

Panel: Jenna Marmon, ODOT; Lake McTighe, Metro; Matt Ferris-Smith, City of Portland
Room: Conservation Hall C
Time: 2:00pm – 2:45pm

We can’t achieve zero roadway fatalities without addressing speed, yet how we design our streets for the intended users and how we legislatively determine roadway speeds on those streets can sometimes be like playing a game of chicken and egg. This session will discuss the latest information on the critical relationship between speed and safety and then delve into the method of setting speeds in Oregon. PBOT will then share their success stories in harnessing the power of speed limits centering on Vision Zero.

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Breakout 4

Sessions begin at 3:15pm
Show Me The Money: Funding Walking and Biking Improvements

Panel: Wendy Johnson, League of Oregon Cities; Susan Peithman, Oregon Department of Transportation; Julie Warncke, City of Salem; Evan Manvel, Oregon Transportation and Growth Management Program
Room: Vista
Time: 3:15pm – 5:00pm

All too often, community visions for a better place to walk and bike get stuck behind a mantra: there’s no money. This shouldn’t end the conversation. There are over 30 sources of money, from the federal government to local measures, private foundations to ODOT funds.

This session features three people with experience finding funds to get things built. After panelists provide an overview of funds and experience of looking for funds at both the local and state/federal level, they will take questions. Attendees will be provided dot votes to choose the top five of the 30 sources to pursue in their community. The session will conclude with panelists providing suggestions on how best to get funds from those five sources.

Note this session will span both Breakout Session 4 and 5 due to length.
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Action Plans and SRTS Trainings and Funding, Oh My!

Panel: Brian Potwin, Commute Options; Cindy Allen, BLAST Supervisor Hillsboro; Pam Cummings, Recreation Program Supervisor City of Hillsboro Parks and Recreation
Room: Conservation Hall A
Time: 3:15pm – 4:00pm

Learn about Commute Options’ Oregon Safe Routes to School (SRTS) statewide technical assistance. Two grant opportunities to complete a SRTS Action Plan and coordinator trainings are available to new programs. Since 2015 Commute Options has assisted communities dealing with difficult local issues and barriers to getting more students to walk and bike to and from school. Practitioners share on tips and lessons learned after their trainings.

SRTS Action Plans help develop a strategy to begin creating fun, convenient and safe opportunities for students to walk/roll to school. Action Plans are a requirement of the ODOT non-infrastructure and upcoming infrastructure application process. Recommendations developed from the Action Plan will range from infrastructure (engineering) improvements to programmatic actions (education and encouragement, and enforcement). The Oregon SRTS Program highly encourages all schools to consider non-infrastructure (education, enforcement, evaluation) components first. Each school team who completes a training can apply for a $1000 stipend to complete actionable items documented in the School Action Plan.

Commute Options also offers Train-the-Coordinator (TOC) free trainings for educators and coordinators within a school, district or community. Learn about Safe Routes for Kids/Neighborhood Navigators Curriculum, evaluation techniques and tools, how to organize and lead Bike Trains and Walking School Buses and much more!

This session is designed as a roundtable discussion, come with your SRTS questions!

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A First Look at the New AASHTO Bike Guide*

Panel: Rob Burchfield, Toole Design Group
Room: Conservation Hall B
Time: 3:15pm – 4:00pm

The Toole Design Group is leading a major update to the AASHTO Guide for the Development of Bicycle Facilities. The AASHTO Guide is the most widely used reference for the design of bicycle facilities. Release of the updated Guide is expected in late 2018 or early 2019. This session will provide an overview of the content of the proposed Guide and highlight some of the key areas where new design guidance will be provided including separated bike lanes, bicycle boulevards, and bike signals.

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Bike Share Programs Medium and Small, Public and Private*

Panel: Casey Bergh, OSU Cascades (Bend); Tarah Campi, Pedal Corvallis; Valerie Egon, Westside Bike Share Pilot (Washington County); Andrea Napoli, Rogue Bike Share (Ashland and Medford); Adrian Witte, Toole Design Group
Room: Conservation Hall C
Time: 3:15pm – 4:00pm

Bike-sharing has grown at an astounding pace around the country for the past 5 years, with new programs, players, and practices emerging every day. As the bike share movement gains momentum, systems are being launched in an increasingly wide range of settings and with a variety of objectives.

While this is great news for active transportation advocates, the buzz around bike share creates its own challenges. This is particularly true for smaller systems, where funding, development, and administration are often uncharted territory. Where do we start? What are our goals? Who do we engage? How much will it cost? Best practices around small bike share systems are murky at best; launching public program in a city of 50,000 residents is very different from developing a closed program for a private company of 1,000 employees.

This panel is made up of bike share representatives that have gained experience developing and administering small and medium-sized programs in a variety of contexts – each with unique community characteristics and varying levels of funding. While some programs are developed for the general public, others target a particular user group, including private sector employees, university students, and Medicaid members.

By answering questions about the development, planning, and launch of smaller bike share programs, the group will share some of their lessons learned.

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Equity in Active Transportation: Innovative Performance Measures and Advocacy Models*

Panel: Aaron Golub, Portland State University; Elexis Moyer, Multnomah Youth Commission
Room: Skyline
Time: 3:15pm – 4:00pm

This panel will present two different efforts to innovate the ways we address equity in planning for active transportation. The first presentation will discuss performance measures for equity used in planning. Transportation performance measures can highlight changes from a current state or develop targets representing some desired future state. Equity measures need to communicate how those changes, or progress to targets, are distributed among different groups with a focus on communities experiencing transportation challenges. Additionally, the interpretation of equity measures is also important: when do we know a plan or project is fair? This presentation will explore these issues and present example measures and targets.

The second presentation will be about the Multnomah Youth Commission (MYC) Sustainability Committee, which uses Youth-Adult partnerships to tackle transit equity and advocate for YouthPass as a lifeline to opportunity. Over the years, MYC has developed a community-organizing model that incorporates participatory action research, policy creation and advocacy, and youth/adult partnership as its foundational underpinnings. MYC members will share how they are organizing for an equitable transit system.

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Breakout 5

Sessions begin at 4:15pm
Car Free Access to Tourist Destinations*

Panel: Heather McCarey and Lewis Kelley, Explore Washington Park; Jake Warr, Columbia Gorge Express ODOT; Teresa Christopherson, Mt. Hood Express Clackamas County
Room: Conservation Hall A
Time: 4:15pm – 5:00pm

Explore Washington Park, Columbia Gorge Express, and Mt. Hood Express will present on our respective shuttle systems that serve Washington Park, the Columbia River Gorge, and Mt. Hood – Oregon’s top tourist destinations. Each organization runs shuttle services in order to reduce vehicle travel, manage demand for parking, and help mitigate the impact from the ever growing popularity of these top destinations. Our organizations also strive to increase the overall access to these destinations to underserved populations through our shuttle services. In this presentation, we will each share information on our shuttle services including goals, funding sources, operations and measures of success. We will end with an interactive conversation about lessons learned, all from the perspective of agencies that are not traditional transit providers.

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Planning for Safe Routes Investments: A Scaleable Approach*

Panel: Jessica Zdeb, Toole Design Group; Dana Dickman, PBOT
Room: Conservation Hall B
Time: 4:15pm – 5:00pm

This session will provide a case study of how the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) has efficiently planned for Safe Routes to School (SRTS) infrastructure investments for over 100 schools in the city. This project has piloted a new approach to SRTS infrastructure planning through identification of likely walking routes. These routes are the basis for developing a prioritized project list for current and future funding. The session goal is for attendees to understand how PBOT executed this project identification process and how they could apply it, or modifications, to set their communities up for pursuing SRTS infrastructure funding, such as that included in HB 2017. While this was a project for Oregon’s largest city, the session will help attendees understand how aspects of the process could be applied in smaller communities with fewer resources in terms of funding, data, and technical analysis capabilities.

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Top to Bottom: Creating a Plan for Low Stress Bikeways in Your Community*

Panel: Robin Lewis, City of Bend; James Dorofi, Neighborhood Association Leader
Room: Skyline
Time: 4:15pm – 5:00pm

A Transportation System Plan update allows creation of an inclusive, accessible, low stress network of Bikeways for Everyone. Draft Bikeway Facilities Plan includes new policies, guidelines, system map, and standards. Use of a diverse, community wide Sounding Board helps ensure inclusion and acceptance through the process.

Key elements of Bend’s proposal to modernize its bicycling network:

• ODOT’s Low Stress Network tools
• Accessible bikeway design features for tricycles, side-by-side tandem bicycles, and service dogs
• Neighborhood Greenways
• Shared Use Paths and Trails with a new partnership with the Bend Park and Recreation District
• Routable Network Development

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Impacting Health and Racial Equity through Gresham’s Active Transportation Plan

Panel: Jay Higgins, City of Gresham; Luz Gomez, Community Liason
Room: Conservation Hall C
Time: 4:15pm – 5:00pm

How do you go from an “equity lens” to outreach methods or a project list? What are the steps that really make a difference for advancing equity in a transportation plan? Gresham recently completed its first Active Transportation Plan. With the support of Multnomah County Health Department, the City integrated health and equity into the plan’s development from the earliest stages. The project team used a racial equity framework to guide its process and to evaluate the plan’s milestones; the equity lens influenced the project’s goals, data analysis, how the public process was conducted and how the final project list was prioritized. The session will share how the equity lens was applied and the steps the City took to include health and equity considerations in the plan. We’ll talk about how Liaisons hired from the community were central to community engagement and the training that enhanced their communication and leadership skills. We’ll also review the types of data, including community engagement findings, that were used in plan development and how data supported equitable outcomes in project prioritization.

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