Live the Revolution Storyteller Preview

Drumroll, please…presenting our 2017 Live the Revolution storytellers!  All four storytellers will share their personal #bikestories on Friday, February 10th. We sat down with each storyteller for a brief chat about their experiences with biking:

Erin Lolich, Northwest Regional Education Service District

Q: What’s one word that describes the story you’ll be telling?
Shhgggrrr! That’s trademarked.

Q: Is there anything you think people don’t know about you, but they should?
I grew up on a blueberry farm; I’m a former dragon boat captain; and I’ve climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro. I have secret passions for skee ball and roller skating. And I’m a notorious bahn mi thief.

Q: What’s your favorite Revolution? 
About three months ago, a human (cyclist) was killed by another human (motorist) on the St. John’s Bridge. To channel the heartbreak, fear and rage of this way too common incident, a couple folks organized a memorial protest ride. I was one of the hundreds of cyclists who shut down rush hour traffic on the bridge that night. I was there to remember Mitch York, to raise awareness, to ponder my own mortality and vulnerability as a cyclist, and to bear witness with my precious, beloved community. That night was a gorgeous revolution: the kind we’ll need for the next four years.

Q: What’s the most “Portland” thing about you? 
I’m a fourth generation Portlander. Although my family’s roots are decidedly working class, I’ve had a brick with my name on it in Pioneer Courthouse Square since the ’80s. If you visit St. Patrick’s Church in Northwest Portland, you’ll see my family’s name all over the stained glass windows. Bud Clark (expose yourself, newcomers, this local reference is imperative) and Earl Blumenauer came to family picnics when I was a kid. When I hand my credit card to someone, they ask if I’m related to…and I say, “Yes” before listening to the name. I still call it Washington Park Zoo.

And then there’s the stereotypically jejune…I’m in love with the indie music scene. I prefer my eggs free range and my man scruffy. I waiver between Democrat and Green. My dog has an acupuncturist. I know my coffee roaster, brewer and vintner by name—they sponsor our cyclocross team.

Erik Tonkin, Sellwood Cycle Repair

Q: What was your favorite thing about riding your bike as a child? 
Jumping, wheelies—and crashing, too!

Q: What’s one word that describes the story you’ll be telling?
Challenging.

Q: Is there anything about the storytelling process that surprised you? Scared you? Excited you?
What scares me is the challenge to be understood; I hope my story makes clear how I feel about it. We all want and need to be understood, to be listened to. I find this challenge very exciting, and that doesn’t surprise me!

Q: What’s been your worst bike ride? What about your best bike ride?
If I limit that reference to bike races, they are usually one in the same—my best efforts often result in my greatest sense of “failure,” what was close revealing itself as very far away. As I improve, I learn how much more I still can. I suppose that’s why I race—and ride and live.

Q: If there was one piece of advice you could give your 10-year-old self, what would it be?
“It’s going to be OK.”

Ric Hjertberg, Wheel Fanatyk

Q: When did you start riding a bike, and who helped you learn to ride?

I started riding a tricycle at age 2, bicycle at 6 ( a red, Murray, 24-inch-wheel, coaster braked bike). My dad pushed me around but ironically never rode himself.

Q: Who is your favorite person to ride with?
While no one is unwelcome, I am happiest riding alone; just me and the world!

Q: What’s your advice to someone who wants to start biking or commuting by bike more often?
To get started, nothing beats direct contact with a happy, practical rider. Their enthusiasm is contagious, and a newbie will become infected with their confidence and joy.

Q: Is there anything about the storytelling process that surprised you? 
Nothing has yet surprised me about the storytelling process. Thoughtful, respectful, engaging stories are key to community; not voluminous downloads that serve the teller, but digestible and generous ones that entertain and uplift the listener.

Lale Santelices, PBOT Safe Routes to School

Q: If there was one piece of advice you could give your 10-year-old self, what would it be?
Make more fart jokes, while it is still socially acceptable 😉

Q: Why do you enjoy riding a bike now, as an adult?
Riding a bike as an adult is better than getting stuck in traffic or having to parallel park.

Q: What’s your favorite vice?
I obsess about what I should do in case of an earthquake, in case I’m riding on a bridge, including:

  • Should I bike slowly? Or quickly pedal forward?
  • Should I jump off the bridge or try and hold on?
  • Will my helmet protect me if something falls on my head?
  • Will my helmet help me float?

Q: Is there anything you think people don’t know about you but they should?
I am kind of shy and really nervous, so please be kind.

You can learn more about all four storytellers’ personal #bikestories by getting your ticket to Live the Revolution today. Join us for a lively night of bikey entertainment with food, drinks, and brilliant bike stories on Friday, February 10th at the Alberta Abbey. Proceeds benefit our Safe Routes to School education programs.

 

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